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A Sourcebook for the Worldwide Discovery of a Creative Organic Universe
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Recent Additions: New and Updated Entries in the Past 60 Days
Displaying entries 1 through 15 of 114 found.


> Geonativity

Castro, Daniel. et al. In and Out of Criticality? State-Dependent Scaling in the Rat Visual Cortex. PRX Life. 2/023008, 2024. In this new Physical Review journal, eight Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil and University of Minho, Braga, Portugal system physicians add a latest appreciation of how our cerebral processes indeed do seem to bounce around a best performance balance.

A presumed proximity to a critical point is believed to endow the brain with scale-invariant statistics to confer advantages for information processing, storage, and transmission. To assess scaling and cortical states, we apply a renormalization group method to data recordings from the anesthetized rat's visual cortex. Under anesthesia, cortical states shift across synchronization levels defined by population spiking rate variability. We find that scaling signatures only appear as spiking frequency surpasses a threshold. Our results suggest that a wide range of cortical states corresponds to small deviations around a critical point, with the system fluctuating in and out of criticality, spending roughly three-quarters of the experiment duration within a scaling regime. (Abstract excerpt)

> Geonativity

Nettuno, Beatrice, et al. The role of mobility in epidemics near criticality. arXiv:2402.06505. Four years into the pandemic, a team of biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-University including Erwin Frey achieve a host sophisticated mathematical formulation which draws upon and widely applies both physical principles and complexity science. Renormalization group theory and self-organized phase transitions are found to independently underline and channel this dynamic public malady wherever it occurs.

The general epidemic process (GEP) describes its spread within a population of susceptible individuals. We investigate the impact of mobility on disease spreading threshold by two generalizations of GEP, where the mobility of susceptible and recovered individuals is examined independently. The critical dynamics are studied through a perturbative renormalization group approach and large-scale stochastic simulations. This analysis predicts that both models belong to the same universality class which describe the critical epidemic dynamics. At the associated renormalization group fixed point, the immobile species decouples from the dynamics of the infected species due to coupling with the diffusive species.. Numerical simulations in two dimensions affirm our renormalization group results by identifying the same set of critical exponents for both models. (Excerpt)

> Geonativity

Okur, Zeynep, et al. Control of neuronal excitation–inhibition balance by BMP–SMAD1 signalling. Nature. April 17, 2024. University of Basel, Basel and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Basel neuro-researchers describe further findings that constant cerebral processes do indeed reside at a best dynamic balance of less or more stimulation. Once again, in every phenomenal way it seems, nature seeks and prefers this optimum reciprocity.


Throughout life, neuronal networks in the mammalian neocortex maintain a balance of excitation and inhibition states that are essential for neuronal computation. To maintain this poise, microcircuits composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons adjust their connectivity and function. Here we study a signal pathway in the adult mouse neocortex where overactive neurons are sent to the network by higher levels of BMP2, a growth factor. Ultimately, this impairment of the functional recruitment of PV interneurons disrupts the cortical excitation–inhibition balance, with mice exhibiting seizures. Our findings suggest that developmental morphogen signalling is repurposed to stabilize cortical networks in the adult mammalian brain.
Despite a wide range of sensory stimulus, cortical circuits exhibit stable activity patterns that enable optimal information coding by the network. These adaptations happen from near instantaneous adjustments of excitation and inhibition during sensory processing, to slower modifications of synaptic connectivity. Thus, both rapid cell-intrinsic and long-lasting transcellular signalling processes have evolved to ensure the function and stability of the cortical network. (6)

Our Planatural Edition: A 21st Century PhiloSophia, EarthTwinity, Ecosmic WumanVersion

The Genesis Vision > News

Del Santo, Flavio and Nicolas Gisin. Creative and geometric times in physics, mathematics, logic, and philosophy. arXiv:2404.06566. University of Geneva natural scholars offer an insightful way so as to appreciate something constructive going on by itself. The phrase “creative time” is drawn from Henri Bergson a century earlier.

We propose a distinction between two concepts of time that play a role in physics: geometric and creative. The former is the time of deterministic physics and merely parametrizes a given evolution. The latter is characterized by real change, i.e. novel formation when a non-necessary event becomes occurs in an indeterministic physics. This allows us to cite a naturalistic presence as the moment that separates the potential future from the determined past. We discuss how these two concepts find applications in classical and intuitionistic mathematics and in classical and multivalued tensed logic. (Abstract).

There is almost nothing that we perceive so ubiquitously than the passage of time. And yet our most successful physical theories still struggle to make sense of this concept in an unequivocal way. Actually, modern physics has relegated time to play a less and less special role [1]. However, in the words of Ilya Prigogine, “no formulation of the laws of nature that does not take into account this constructive role of time can ever be satisfactory.” (1)

The Genesis Vision > News

Frank, Adam, et al. The Blind Spot: Why Science Cannot Ignore Human Experience.. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2024. . As this decade goes on, senior scholars AF, University of Rochester, MG, Dartmouth College and ET, University of British Columbia convened for some time to come to the realization that a main lacunae of 21st century thought was the exclusion of any human place and relevance in a cosmic to cultural scenario, which is then relegated to accidental. While scientific descriptions achieved by our sapient acumen run from muons to a multiverse, it is rarely imagined that our present learned occasion has any other phenomenal or participatory account.

In The Blind Spot, astrophysicist Adam Frank, cosmologist Marcelo Gleiser, and philosopher Evan Thompson call for a revolutionary scientific worldview which includes humanity as a vital part of objective truth. For centuries people have looked to science to tell us who we are, where we come from, and where we’re going, but without our own inclusion. This Blind Spot impedes our learning about the universe, quantum physics, life, AI, mind, consciousness, and Earth as a precious planet. As a result, we can view ourselves as an intended source of nature’s self-understanding, going forward in the new millennium.

The Genesis Vision > News

Gontier, Nathalie, et al, eds.. Oxford Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2024. The volume editors are NG, University of Lisbon, Andy Lock, Massey University, Australia and Chris Sinha, University of East Anglia, UK. The quotes next provide a good gist of this expansive scholastic collection as it has become newly enhanced by diverse global collaborations. Typical authoritative entries could be A Timeline for the Acquisition of Symbolic Cognition in the Human Lineage by Ian Tattersall, The Aboutness of Language and the Evolution of the Construction-ready Brain by Michael Arbib, The Evolution of Language and Speech by Antonio Benítez-Burraco and Dan Dediu, Animal Signals and Symbolism by Ulrike Griebel and D. Kimbrough Oller and Archewriting: The Symbolic Evolution of Script and Narrative by Rukmini Bhaya Nair. But from our late 2020s vantage, this historic collective cognitive sapience by which to accumulate a worldwise knowledge repository could be seen, in retrospect, as a intended descriptive re-presentation of a self-making participatory genesis to itself.

The capacity to symbolize and the use of symbols concern every aspect of human life. This dedicated volume investigates how such a capability arose in human development and is expressed in many areas of societal life. Thirty-nine topical chapters grouped into six themes that focus on epistemological, psychological, anthropological, ethological, linguistic, and social-technological dimensions. The handbook presents an in-depth, interdisciplinary, and comprehensive overview of the state of the art and science of this premier distinction of our individual and collective Earthumanity. (Publisher)

The Evolution of the Biological Sciences This chapter introduces the main research schools along which the field of evolutionary biology has proceeded. It was for some time as n the paradigm that combines traditional (Neo) Darwinism with those of the genomic Modern Synthesis. This 20th century view has since diversified into the Micro-, Meso-, and Macro-evolutionary schools which altogether compose an Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Eco-Evo-Devo). A 21st century version studies Reticulate Evolution (see NG) by means of symbiosis, lateral gene transfer, infective heredity, and hybridization. My second chapter examines how these different aspects are implemented into the symbolic sciences such as psychology, linguistics, anthropology, archaeology, sociology, and economics. (Chap. 1, N. Gontier)

The Genesis Vision > News

Heylighen, Francis, et al. The Third Story of the Universe: an evolutionary worldview for the noosphere. cris.vub.be/ws/portalfiles/portal/110058395/Third_Story_working_paper.pdf. Center Leo Apostel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel polyscholars FH, Shima Beigi and Clement Vidal achieve a March 2024 working paper synopsis to date of this unfolding worldwise 21st century life-centered revolution. A main guide is the visionary writings of the Jesuit scientist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin about complexity, consciousness and the imminent collective noosphere. A presentation was made at The Noosphere at 100 conference, see Earth Learns for more.

This report is a first survey of a new, evolutionary narrative, called the Third Story, intended to replace and complement the earlier religious (First) and mechanistic (Second) worldviews. We contend that confusions due to a world that is ever more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) have eroded people’s sense of the world as comprehensible and manageable. The First Story provides meaning and values, but they no longer provide an accurate guidance. The Second Story sees the universe as a clockwork mechanism governed by the laws that allow us to build technologies but without any basis. Our Third Story version views nature as organizing itself towards increasing complexity and consciousness so as to produce matter, life, mind and society. Its implicit value is to invite individuals to work towards a global integration of the noosphere as an Earthuman superorganic ecosystem.

The Third Story is the newly emerging scientific worldview which sees the universe as self-organizing and evolving towards greater complexity and consciousness. It retains the understanding, prediction and technology provided by the Second Story, but adds that we are free in making informed decisions. It further gives a sense of wholeness and coherence by seeing individuals as part of the global superorganism or noosphere. Thus the Third Story appears to combine the benefits of First and Second Stories without their limitations, while offering a comprehensive, science-based worldview that includes a concrete sense of purpose, ethics and values. (22)

The Genesis Vision > News

Hidalgo, Carlos, editor-in-chief.. EPS Grand Challenges: Physics for Society in the Horizon 2050.. Europe: IOP Science., 2024. The European Physics Society publishes a series of leading edge volumes as this, Google terms. This is an 800 page edition with over 100 senior authors such as Sara Seager, Jurgen Kurths, Frances Westall, Jacob Biamonte, Marc Barthelemy and Thiery Mora. Its relevance is evident by two main parts: Physics as global human enterprise for understanding Nature and Physics developments to tackling major issues affecting the lives of citizens. While a collection of disparate subjects, altogether as it looks ahead, one gets a sense of current advances and adventures by way of myriad planetary collaborations.

There are many images of science and of scientists. Some would imply that science will eventually reach the limits of knowledge while others create an expectation of endless horizons. In this book, we will look at all these aspects, going from particles, to atoms, cells, organisms, stars, galaxies and our own place in the universe. We explore what makes us, human beings, unique by an ability to imagine and shape the future through the scientific method. The book is an EPS action designed to address the social dimension of science and the grand challenges in physics so to benefit developed societies, raise standards of living at the global scale, and provide basic understanding of nature on the 2050 horizon.

Physics bridging the infinities. Chapter 2 presents an introduction and sections on: particle physics: physics beyond the Standard Model; the origin of visible matter; quantum gravity—an unfinished revolution; what is the Universe made of? Searching for dark energy/matter; a gravitational universe: black holes and gravitation waves; stars, the Sun, and planetary systems as physics laboratories; physics of the Earth's interior.

Physics for understanding life. Chapter 4 presents an introduction and sections on: searching for life in the Universe: our place in the Universe; artificial intelligence: powering the fourth industrial revolution; artificial life: sustainable self-replicating systems; toward a quantitative understanding of life; the emergence of life: the Sun–Earth connection.

Physics for secure and efficient societies. Chapter 7 presents an introduction and sections on: second quantum revolution: quantum computing and cybersecurity; sensors and their applications; the space sector: current and future prospects; large-scale complex sociotechnical systems and their interactions.

The Genesis Vision > News

Hooft, Gerard t. et al.. The sounds of science a symphony for many instruments and voices.. Physica Scripta. 99/052501, 2024. As the abstract says, this 54 page edition is a second endeavor to gather diverse, select authorities including Nobel laureates to survey these conceptual frontiers. A first 2020 edition with this title appeared in this journal (95/6) edited by Gerianne Alexander. Typical entries are What characterises topological effects in physics? by Gerard ’t Hooft, Towards a machine that works like the brain: the neuromorphic computer by Ivan Schuller, et al, What can we say about the ‘Value of information’ in Biophysics? by Lázaro Castanedo, et al, What philosophers should really be thinking about by Roland Allen and Suzy Lidström and How much of physics have we found so far? By Anton Zeilinger. But again some 20 men and 3 women contribute essays with a specific focus sans any common theme. While disparate approaches within an intelligible cosmos are pursued, there is rarely a sense of closing on a real discovery. (see also at arXiv:2404.11724.)

Despite its amazing quantitative successes and contributions to revolutionary technologies, physics currently faces many unsolved mysteries ranging from the meaning of quantum mechanics to the nature of the dark energy and the future of the Universe. It is clearly prohibitive for the general reader, and even the best informed physicists, to follow the vast number of technical papers published in the thousands of specialized journals. For this reason, we have asked the leading experts across many of the most important areas of physics to summarise their global assessment of some of the most important issues. In lieu of an extremely long abstract summarising the contents, we invite the reader to look at the section headings and their authors, and then to indulge in a feast of stimulating topics spanning the current frontiers of fundamental physics from The Future of Physics by William D Phillips and What characterises topological effects in physics? by Gerard t Hooft through the contributions of the widest imaginable range of world leaders in their respective areas.

The Genesis Vision > News

Kogut, Alan, et al. Kogut, Alan, et al. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE): Mission Design and Science Goals. arXiv:2405.20403. We note this posting by seventeen astroscientists from across the USA, onto the UK, France and beyond led by NASA Goddard which detailed project plans as Earthropo sapiens proceeds apace with the task of astronomic self-quantification. See also The SKA Galactic Centre Survey: A White Paper at arXiv:2406.04022. Along with many similar endeavors, what a grand scenario is altogether revealed whence our unique knowsphere commences on an intrinsic course of (multi)universal self-quantification, representation, and select affirmation.

The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) mission concept plans to measure the energy spectrum and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). PIXIE opens a broad discovery space for the origin, contents, and evolution of the universe. Measurements of small distortions from a CMB blackbody spectrum provide a robust determination of the mean electron pressure and temperature in the universe while constraining processes including dissipation of primordial density perturbations, black holes, and the decay or annihilation of dark matter. We describe the PIXIE instrument sensitivity, foreground subtraction, and anticipated science return from both the baseline 2-year mission and a potential extended mission. (Excerpt)

Pedia Sapiens: A Planetary Progeny Comes to Her/His Own Actual Factual Knowledge

A Learning Planet > Mindkind Knowledge

The Noosphere at 100: The Future of Human Collective Consciousness.. https://event.fourwaves.com/n2conference/pages.. A home page for a gathering all about the 100th anniversary of the prescient conception of a global brain-like formation foreseen by Pierre Teilhard, Vladimir Vernadsky and Pierre Leroy in Paris in the early 1920s. A century later a prime rationale is the major evolutionary transitions scale which well bodes for its a consummate fulfillment, see next quotes. The meeting was arranged by the Human Energy initiative, see below, founded and led by David Sloan Wilson. The whole show achieves treads an innovative frontier by way of especial concerned voices and visions. A full list of speaker bios and paper abstracts are available on the site. In regard, see The Third Story of the Universe: an evolutionary worldview for the noosphere by Francis Heylighen, et al (search herein) about a 21st century revolution.


From the earliest forms of symbolic communication to the development of language, the printing press, and eventually the internet and AI, the activity and content of human knowing has been evolving. Becoming more and more complex, it has increasingly moved beyond the individual mind and into a shared space of interconnected thought. In 1923, Jesuit paleontologist and philosopher Teilhard de Chardin, in conversation with other early evolutionary scientists, coined the term “noosphere,” from the Greek term noos (mind) to name this newly conceived reality. A newer, “thinking layer” of the earth, the noosphere has evolved beyond the geosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere on which it depends and is the network into which all human thought taps and contributes.

The N2 Conference is sponsored by Human Energy, a research, media, and educational organization to introduce the noosphere as a Third Story of the universe that can provide a source of meaning and hope for future generations. The 3-day conference over November 17 – 19, 2023 at University of California, Berkeley, features thought leaders, scholars across fields, and eminent scientists, including, Johan Bollen, Anne Clin, Terrence Deacon, Ilia Delio, Ben Goertzel, Francis Heylighen, Robert Lawrence Kuhn, Raphael Liogier, Louis Savary, Gregory Stock, Brian Thomas Swimme, David Sloan Wilson, and others.

On Being a Noospheric Species Teilhard argued that the human evolutionary process does not exhibit the diversification and specialization pattern of biological evolution in general. Rather it has a convergent character. Today this has parallels with the recognition of major transitions that involved the coming together of autonomous organisms to form higher orders such as multicellular organisms like us. Symbolic communication (e.g. language) contributes to this unification because it enables thoughts to be shared and cognition to be collaborative. In this respect, humans have long been part of a collaborative mental process, a noosphere. (Terrence Deacon)

Human Energy’s team of scholars, scientists, philosophers, educators, and professionals are at the forefront of new research into the future of human collective consciousness. Our contributors bring together insights from neuroscience, anthropology, psychology, astrophysics, technology, data science, humanistic management, social entrepreneurship, environmental design, communication, education, sustainability, spirituality, and world affairs. Evolution is progressing towards a greater collective potential. Deeper understanding of this paradigm shift will enable humanity to tap into our full potential and ensure the flourishing of our species and our planet. At Human Energy, we find hope in the potential of humanity’s collective intelligence. (www.humanenergy.io/about)

A Learning Planet > Mindkind Knowledge

Helighen, Francis, et al. The Third Story of the Universe: an evolutionary worldview for the noosphere. cris.vub.be/ws/portalfiles/portal/110058395/Third_Story_working_paper.pdf. Center Leo Apostel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel polyscholars FH, Shima Beigi and Clement Vidal achieve a March 2024 working paper synopsis to date of this unfolding worldwise 21st century life-centered revolution. A main guide is the visionary writings of the Jesuit scientist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin about complexity, consciousness and the imminent collective noosphere. A presentation was made at The Noosphere at 100 conference, see Earth Learns or more.

This report is a first survey of a new, evolutionary narrative, called the Third Story, intended to replace and complement the earlier religious (First) and mechanistic (Second) worldviews. We contend that confusions due to a world that is ever more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) have eroded people’s sense of the world as comprehensible and manageable. The First Story provides meaning and values, but they no longer provide an accurate guidance. The Second Story sees the universe as a clockwork mechanism governed by the laws that allow us to build technologies but without any basis. Our Third Story version views nature as organizing itself towards increasing complexity and consciousness so as to produce matter, life, mind and society. Its implicit value is to invite individuals to work towards a global integration of the noosphere as an Earthuman superorganic ecosystem.

The Third Story is the newly emerging scientific worldview which sees the universe as self-organizing and evolving towards greater complexity and consciousness. It retains the understanding, prediction and technology provided by the Second Story, but adds that we are free in making informed decisions. It further gives a sense of wholeness and coherence by seeing individuals as part of the global superorganism or noosphere. Thus the Third Story appears to combine the benefits of First and Second Stories without their limitations, while offering a comprehensive, science-based worldview that includes a concrete sense of purpose, ethics and values. (22)

A Learning Planet > Mindkind Knowledge

Huh, Minyoung, et al.. Huh, Minyoung, et al. The Platonic Representation Hypothesis. . Neural networks, trained with different objectives on different data and modalities, are converging to a shared statistical model of reality in their representation spaces. We cite this May entry by MIT computer scientists including Phillip Isola as an example of how these many large language models could be altogether seen as coming to their own planetary universion discovery. See also Learning and Leveraging World Models in Visual Representation Learning by Quentin Garrido, et al at arXiv:2403.00504. As incendiary conflicts worsen, the novel presence of an intelligent sapiensphere, aka an actual global brain, learning on her/his own could bring a salutary alternative we so need.

We argue that representations in AI models by way of deep neural networks, are in a convergence stage. First, we survey many examples in the literature over time and across multiple domains. Next, we demonstrate common trends across data modalities: as vision and language models get larger, they measure distance between datapoints in similar forms. We propose that this convergence is heading toward a shared statistical model of the world, akin to Plato's concept of an ideal reality. We dub this occasion as a platonic representation and discuss possible selective pressures toward it. Finally, we consider knowledgeable implications of these trends, within limits. (Abstract)

Our central hypothesis is that the representation we are converging toward is a statistical model of an underlying reality that generates our observations. Consistent with the multitask scaling hypothesis, such an appreciation would naturally be useful toward many tasks. Additionally, this worldview might be relatively simple, assuming that scientists are correct in suggesting that the fundamental laws of nature are indeed simple functions (Gell-Mann, 1995), in line with the simplicity bias hypothesis. (7)

Phillip Isola is an assistant professor and a principal investigator in MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. His work focuses on why we represent the world the way we do, and how we can replicate these abilities in digital forms. Before coming to MIT, he was a visiting research scientist at OpenAI. He earned a PhD in brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and spent two years as a postdoc at the University of California, Berkeley.

A Learning Planet > Mindkind Knowledge > deep

Farisco, Michele, et al. Is artificial consciousness achievable? Lessons from the human brain. arXiv:2405.04540. We cite these neuroscience considerations of a potential AI sentience by MF, Uppsala University, Kathinka Evers, Biology and Molecular Genetics Institute, Italy and Jean-Pierre Changeux, Institut Pasteur, Paris for themselves and because the third author is a renowned octogenarian authority (search).

We consider the question of developing artificial consciousness from an evolutionary perspective, taking the sentient human brain as a reference. Several structural and functional features that appear to reach human-like complex awareness are identified which AI research needs to take into account. Even if AI is limited in its ability to emulate human consciousness for both intrinsic (structural and architectural) and extrinsic (scientific and technological knowledge) reasons, taking inspiration from cerebral attributes is a strategy towards perceptive AI. Therefore, we recommend neuroscience-inspired caution in talking about artificial consciousness. In regard, we propose to specify what is common and what differs in AI conscious processing from our full human experience. (Abstract)

A Learning Planet > Mindkind Knowledge > deep

Strachan, James, et al. Testing theory of mind in large language models and humans. Nature Human Behaviour. May, 2024. Into 2024, twelve computational neuroscientists posted in Germany, Italy, the UK and USA can begin to notice basic affinities between our own cerebral cognition and perceptive capabilities in these nascent cyberspace faculties. See also The Platonic Representation Hypothesis by Minyoung Huh, et al. arXiv:2405.07987 and Predicting the next sentence (not word) in large language models by Shaoyun Yu, et al in Science Advancesfor May 2024. Altogether a viable sense of a global brain as it envelopes the biosphere becomes evident. As these many articles contend, for better or worse depending on how well we might understand and moderate.

At the core of what defines us as humans is the concept of theory of mind: the ability to be aware of other people’s mental states. The development of large language models (LLMs) such as ChatGPT has led to the possibility that they exhibit behaviour similar to our theory of mind tasks. Here we compare human and LLM performance from understanding false beliefs to interpreting indirect requests and recognizing irony. We found that GPT-4 models performed at human levels for indirect requests, false beliefs and misdirection, but struggled with faux pas. These findings show that LLMs are consistent with mentalistic inference in humans and highlight the need for testing to ensure valid comparisons between human and artificial intelligences. (Abstract)

As artificial intelligence (AI) continues to evolve, it also becomes increasingly important to heed calls for open science to these models. Direct access to the parameters, data and documentation used to construct models can allow for targeted probing and experimentation into the key parameters affecting social reasoning, informed by and building on comparisons with human data. As such, open models can not only serve to accelerate the development of future AI technologies but also serve as models of human cognition. (7)

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